Friday, 28 July 2017

Restore Faith in Democracy - Vote in the Best Story Poll!

Supernatural Tales 35Perhaps it should be titled 'Your Favourite Story', but what the heck. 

The point is that you can vote for the story you like best in the latest issue. Or - and this is a bit of a radical change - you can vote for more than one story! Oh yes, multiple answers are permitted if you really can't decide. 

The poll should be over to the top right. Let me know if it isn't working, you can't see it, or it insulted you or your family etc.

As They Grow Older



As they grow older - Cover revised.png

My redoubtable assistant editor at ST, Stephen Cashmore, has published a collection of his own spooky stories
As the title implies this is a book about childhood - more precisely, it's a series of stories the author told to his own children over many years. The tales begin simply, with stories for the very young, and end with what's loosely termed teenage or young adult fiction. It's a neat idea, and not one I've ever seen in ghostly fiction before. As such it is a study in childhood, in family life, and in the development of a writer's technique. 

I will have a more detailed review of this professionally-produced book in due course. In the meantime, mosey on over to the site to find out a little bit more. Oh, and for every copy sold a pound goes to cancer research - another good reason to check it out!

Wednesday, 26 July 2017

Tarot, Tarot, Who's Yer Spooky Friend?

Apart from the terrible 'joke' in the title, what do we have here? Only H.R. Giger's designs for the Tarot, that's all. You can see the evolutionary  link to that big scary alien.



The same article has a link to Dali's Tarot designs - I did not know about these either!

dali-tarot

Here's a video about Dali's Universal Tarot.




Tuesday, 25 July 2017

'Intruder'

The third story in Cold Iron: Ghost Stories for the 21st Century is by Kitty Fitzgerald. She's a familiar name to me, having had radio dramas produced by Radio 4. Her story is written in the present tense, giving a dramatic immediacy. Her protagonist, Polly, is a woman who has been diagnosed with cancer, and is taking a bath when a strange young man appears in her flat.

The obvious part of the story is the ghost. I don't think the author intends you to see the intruder as a normal human being. Terry is a ghost, even thought he does bring a bottle. Terry's behaviour is that of the narcissistic obsessive, a stalker type who resents the fact that Polly has never noticed him. He proceeds to lecture his hapless victim with gibberish about unconventional cancer treatments while Polly tries to think of a way to avoid being attacked by this nutter.

The ending is of course the revelation that Terry died from cancer at exactly the time he appeared in Polly's flat. Given that we know this, or something very like it, must be the ending, what are we supposed to make of the story? It's a little flimsy, as Terry is unpleasant but not very substantial. Perhaps the real message is that, if you have cancer, you have to put up with a lot of peripheral crap from stupid and/or unpleasant people.

Another instalment in this running review tomorrow, with luck!